Animal Care Specialists Focus on Care in Transport

By Jennifer Woods, animal care specialist

Over the past 10 years, the agriculture industry, along with government, has invested significant time, brain-power, and research dollars into improving livestock transport. From environmental management and protection, to welfare indicators, to ideal time in transit, to handling and finally trailer design, all aspects of animal transport have been reviewed in our quest for constant improvement of animal welfare.

Bison are loaded and headed to the U.S. Photo credit: Robert Johnson

Bison are loaded and headed to the U.S. Photo credit: Robert Johnson

Canada is the only country that has a livestock transport training program (Canadian Livestock Transport Certification) that allows livestock transporters, handlers, and producers to become certified in transport of five species: cattle, sheep, pigs, horses, and poultry. To date, over 2,000 people are currently CLT certified.

Animals arriving at slaughter plants and departing or arriving at feedlots are audited to insure animal welfare standards are being met. Loads are also regularly inspected by CFIA for compliance to our animal transportation regulations.

Did you know? There’s an app for Farm Animal Care! It includes information on best practices for animal transport. Read about that, here.

All of the major commodity groups in Canada (cattle, sheep, dairy, pigs, horses, and poultry) have developed guidelines and decision trees to insure all animals being transported are fit for the ride. These tools provide farmers, ranchers, and drivers with direction and guidance on what animals can be transported.

First responders, enforcement personnel, and transporters across Canada have been provided opportunities for training in Livestock Emergency Response for motor vehicle accidents. They also have access to numerous rescue trailers specifically designed for response to emergency situations involving livestock.

Animal care specialists are continually working towards improvement in livestock transport through awareness, education, and management tools. Through training programs, transport auditing, research collaboration, and program development, farmers and transporters are provided many opportunities to expand their knowledge, develop their skills, and insure they are always doing what is best for the animals in their care.

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