Yes, There’s an App for Farm Animal Care

By Kristen Kelderman, Farm Animal Care Coordinator, Farm & Food Care

The days of carrying a notepad around the farm still exist, but there’s a new kid in the barn and field that carries a lot more functionality than a farmer’s well-worn pad of paper.

Farmers love technology and have embraced it willingly, from GPS-equipped tractors, to radio frequency eartags, to robotic milking machines. Maybe some generations have adopted it faster than others, and certainly some forms more than others, but farming and technology go hand-in-hand.

Thinking back to where mobile tech was just a few years ago when I picked up my first cell phone. I was a late bloomer for a millennial. I distinctly remember a conversation with my dad about texting that went something like this…

“Why would you text anyone? If I want something I’m going to pick up the phone and talk to a person. Who needs texting?” My siblings and I just shook our heads thinking that dad will never get it.

Fast forward to today, most of my communications with dad are through text messaging. We kids had it wrong. Now dad sends me pictures from the farm, uses abbreviations like lol (properly!) and populates his messages with emojis. And I love it.

Usually he has a newer phone than me, carries it everywhere with him and is always asking me if I’ve downloaded the latest app. But the guy doesn’t use Facebook. Or that tweetagram thing, as he calls it. But, like many other farmers, he recognizes that some apps have made farming more innovative, efficient, informed, and sometimes even easier.  

IMPACT 2Whatever you can dream up, there is probably an app for that. And now with Farm & Food Care’s IMPACT program there’s an app for animal care information.

Accessing info on animal care has never been easier from the barn, field or beside the chute.

The multi-species app offers information on euthanasia, procedures, handling, transport and other general care. Videos, articles, decision trees, loading density calculator are all at your fingertips and in your pocket. It’s not your grandpa’s factsheet!

Don’t want to read an article or watch a video on your phone screen? You can email it to yourself and watch it later. You can also bookmark what is important to you and share it between your employees, colleagues, and fellow farmers.

The app is available for download for Apple and Android devices, and is free. Have a new employee starting on your farm? Use it as part of your training program or implement it into on-going training.

Download it today. If you don’t have a smart phone, not to worry. IMPACT resources are available online by visiting www.farmIMPACT.ca.

Technology can be great but if you regularly experience a slow internet, let the Farm & Food Care office know. A USB stick with videos and content can be sent to your farm. There are options, no matter your circumstances.

Regardless of how you prefer to access information today — apps, websites, carrier pigeons — there is no doubt that we live in the age of endless information and technology has played a large roll in this. Farmers know the value of continually learning the best practices for today, tomorrow and for generations to come.

Activists bring devastation and death to Ontario mink farm

By Kelly Daynard

Kirk Rankin can well remember an early morning last summer when he walked out to his barns in the morning and discovered that they’d been broken into overnight. “I felt anger and an incredible sick feeling in my stomach knowing the mess that was waiting for me inside.”

And a mess it was — 6,300 minks released from their cages from two of Rankin’s barns. There were many casualties both related to the animals being let out and then a subsequent bout of pneumonia that went through the surviving animals as a result of the incredible stress on the barn’s inhabitants.

Fast forward nine months to last weekend when another 500 mink were released from a farm in Brant County. That makes four break ins/releases in Ontario in the last year accounting for about 8,000 animals.

Rankin, who is a past president of the Canadian Mink Breeders Association and one of 300 Canadian mink farmers, is emotional when he talks about the impact on his animals and on the industry. “We’re an industry under attack,” he says, adding, “The people who do this call themselves animal activists but they’re killing — not helping — the animals.”

image1In the most recent case, the barn was filled with litters of newborn kits (baby mink) who were between one and 10 days of age. These babies are no bigger than your finger, in most cases. “Their mothers provide all their warmth and all their food,” Rankin says.

He explained that it’s almost impossible for humans to tell one kit from another. As a result, after a break in, it’s virtually impossible to reconnect the babies with their real mothers and mother animals are far less likely to nurse kits that aren’t their own.

The adults, he said, are also ill prepared to handle life outside of the barn. “They’ve never had to hunt for food,” Rankin says, “they’ll starve on their own.”

In the latest case, activists gained entry by cutting through the side of the barn before unhooking security cameras and opening 500 pens to release the mink.

Rankin is a fourth generation Canadian mink farm. It was started by his grandfather Dow in 1937 and continued by his father Jim when he came home from college in 1949 to farm. Today, Kirk is assisted by his sons Jamie and Curtis and nephew Steve who are the fourth generation of the family to raise mink.

Kirk has a passion for animal welfare and sits on a number of national organizations. In 2013, he led a committee responsible for updating the Code of Practice for Farmed Mink.  Codes of Practice are the national guidelines that farmers follow when caring for farm animals. The 60 page document covers all aspects of mink care — housing requirements, feed and water, floor space, air quality, veterinary care, transportation and more.

Work on the document was done by a committee of experts from across the country representing many areas of interest from government and farmers to humane societies, veterinarians and researchers. Kirk said that the process was a rewarding one and one that will benefit all mink raised in Canada and all mink farmers. He said that that document has led to significant animal welfare improvements on mink farms — including bigger pens and fewer animals in each pen. “We’ve done so much work to improve animal welfare in our industry,” says Rankin, “but these activists are still coming in and doing terrific damage.” If they want to make a difference, he suggests that they try to work with the industry on animal welfare initiatives instead of killing animals through their actions.

The only good outcome resulting from the break-ins may be the show of support that the farmers experienced from those outraged by the acts of cruelty. More than 40 neighbours and other mink farmers showed up to the latest farm to offer help in catching and saving the animals.

Last summer, the Canadian Mink Breeders Association offered a $75,000 reward for information leading to charges against those responsible. As of yet, that reward has been unclaimed.

Farming with a focus on learning

By: Matt McIntosh

2010 calendarWalt Freeman loves to learn and has no doubt that farming has been one of the most engaging educational opportunities he has ever had.

Walt and Heather – his wife of 35 years – are the owners of a Battersea-area mink farm. The farm backs up to a small lake and was built on land originally purchased by his grandfather in 1921. The couple still live in the original farmhouse, and currently produce an average of 15,000 fur pelts every year. Continue reading

Different areas, same challenges

By Matt McIntosh

In September, I had a chance to visit Alberta for the first time since I was a child, and while there, I visited a few farms in conjunction with the annual conference of the Canadian Farm Writers’ Federation.

I come from farm country in Southwestern Ontario, and the diversity between farms in my own province is staggering; the level of diversity between farms at home and out west is even more intriguing. The funny thing is, farmers all seem to encounter similar problems and find similar solutions despite what they produce, where they produce it and on what scale. Continue reading

2015 Faces of Farming calendar features Dunnville turkey farmer for July

By Resi Walt

Brian, Silken, Theo, and Eli Ricker’s Faces of Farming calendar page

Brian, Silken, Theo, and Eli Ricker’s Faces of Farming calendar page

(Dunnville) – If you ask Brian Ricker’s children what they want to be when they grow up, they will tell you without hesitation, “A farmer, just like my dad.” It’s easy to see how much they look up to their father, and that Brian Ricker is a farmer with a big heart.

In 2015, Brian and his three youngest children, Silken, Theo and Eli appear in the tenth anniversary edition of the Faces of Farming calendar, published by Farm & Food Care Ontario. Their page (July) is sponsored by the Turkey Farmers of Ontario.

Although raised on a dairy farm, Brian credits his start in turkey farming to his friend and mentor – John Delane. The two met in the early 1990’s and Brian eventually bought John’s turkey farm from him. Continue reading

Livestock Handling Tips from Dr. Temple Grandin

Livestock handling tips from Dr. Temple Grandin

By Kelly Daynard

In a recent blog, we focused on a recent presentation by Dr. Temple Grandin that was held in Mississauga and promised to share more about the lecture, sponsored by the Farm & Food Care Foundation.

In a talk that was both entertaining and thought-provoking, Dr. Grandin gave some animal handing tips that were brilliant in their relative simplicity. Here are a few of her examples: Continue reading

Spring on the farm

by Patricia Grotenhuis, lifelong dairy farmer and agricultural advocate

I always found, growing up, one of the hardest questions to answer was “what’s your favourite season?”  I loved them all!  As each change in the seasons came, I would look forward to the change with anticipation. 

Scenes like this may still be a few weeks away but we're already looking forward to them!

Spring, to me, meant a time for new life.  Not only in the barn, either.  Dairy cows have calves year round, which is why we have a steady supply of milk in the grocery stores.  Other animals, like beef cows, sheep and meat goats, have most of their young during the late winter and spring months.  I have always loved driving down the road in the spring, and seeing the young animals out on pasture.  It is a sight that will make me smile every time, no matter how often I see it. Continue reading

DIY food: your own goat = homegrown dairy

Here’s an interesting story on the trend towards growing your own food. I think it’s good they got the message out that it’s 24-7 work and the responsibilities associated with raising farm animals. Not as easy as goldfish! – OFAC

Wency Leung
Globe and Mail Update
Tuesday, Apr. 06, 2010 7:18PM EDT

There are dog people and cat people. And then, there are dairy-loving goat people. Continue reading