“Safe and healthy food production is always number one”

Profile: Gerrid Gust, pulse farmer

“To me, healthy and safe food is the same thing. Everything we grow on our farm, I eat right out of the combine hopper and I would feed to my family. I do not hesitate to sell our grains to consumers. When crops leave our farm, they are natural whole-grain products.”

Gerrid and Monica Gust, together with Gerrid’s parents and his brother and wife, make up Gust Farms Limited, a multi-generation family farm. For over 100 years, the Gusts have farmed in the Davidson area. As active parents of three very busy children, Hannah, Heather and Rhett, Gerrid and Monica are focused on family and their farming business.

On the Gust family farm, they grow 14,000 acres of crops; including pulses such as lentils, peas, and soybeans, as well as more traditional canola, wheat and durum. Pulse crops are the dry seeds of legume plants and are high in protein and fibre and low in fat. They are used in everything from soups and salads to main courses and even a delicious dessert or two.

Gerrid reflects that there are many great benefits to his career in farming.

“I like the freedom to operate my own business,” he explains. “Farming allows me to chart my own course. I appreciate the ability to work on an operation where I have a chance to pass down the farm to the next generation.”

What does Gerrid wish consumers knew about producing food?

“I wish they knew how hard it is to make a living. It’s so important to retain money in the business because when you have bad years, you need to use your savings to pay your bills. To earn a living farming while competing internationally, focusing on economics, focusing on the environment, to do it all properly—it’s not a one-and-done operation. It is multi-year planning. We’re always working to keep getting better.”

“The uncertainty about the weather is a big thing. Weather is so unpredictable. In the city you can turn the tap on if your garden or grass needs watering, but farmers can’t. We rely on Mother Nature to turn the “sprinklers” on. So we put the crop in the ground and do everything that we possibly can to help our crops grow, but Mother Nature still draws the final card.”

Gerrid shares that safe and healthy food production is always number one, followed closely by sustainability. “Food safety is the big thing. We only use approved pesticides and crop protection products, with the highest scientific standards that have been approved by all levels of government, from Health Canada to the Canadian Food Inspection Agency, in addition to the importing countries’ regulations. The cost to the farm and to the environment is just too high to take chances.”

“To be sustainable, we use zero till practices on our land; we try to disturb the soil  as little as possible when we work it. We try to apply the precise amount of fertilizer giving the best growing environment to produce high quality, high-yielding crops. We take soil samples every year which is geo-referenced by satellites and electrical conductivity mapping. If we have lowlands that can’t grow anything, that’s best suited for ducks, then we leave that land for the ducks.”

“To me, healthy and safe food is the same thing.

Everything we grow on our farm, I eat right out of the combine hopper and I would feed to my family. I do not hesitate to sell our grains to consumers. When crops leave our farm, they are natural whole-grain products.”

One thought on ““Safe and healthy food production is always number one”

  1. You deserve hi-5’s for insisting on producing food instead of doing what too many corn growers do by supplying their product for automotive fuel. I’m sure you’ve heard the same fact that there is no reason for any human to go hungry in this world because of lack of potential to produce food but for some reason we go the easy way by producing a product that increases the pollution and environmental impacts from burning fuels like ethanol.
    Have a good day and don’t take too long to get home.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *