Saskatchewan Ranchers Recognized for Their Conservation Commitment

Miles Anderson installing fencing

Miles Anderson installing fencing

Media can sometimes paint a concerning picture of the relationship between agriculture and the environment. Stories of soil erosion, water contamination, and the eradication of native species at the hands of agriculture are all over the Internet, whether fact or fiction.

The stories that are less often told, however, are of the tireless efforts by many in the agricultural community to preserve the land on which they live and work. The Canadian Cattlemen’s Association (CCA)’s Environmental Stewardship Award (TESA) has recognized ranchers who go above and beyond to enhance and protect Canada’s natural landscapes since 1996. This year’s recipients, Miles and Sheri Anderson of Fir Mountain, Saskatchewan, are the perfect examples.

The Anderson ranch is set amongst the naturally rich diversity of badlands, rolling grasslands, rich riparian areas, and sprawling sagebrush in the heart of the Great Plains. The area is home to numerous native species, including several Species at Risk (SARs). Miles Anderson has fostered a variety of relationships with researchers, conservation groups, and other ranchers for many years in his quest to learn about the ecosystem in which he lives and to bridge the gap between the scientific, conservation and agricultural communities. He was instrumental in building the Saskatchewan Prairie Conservation Action Plan (SKCAP) committee in the 1990s, which continues to be the official forum in Saskatchewan to discuss prairie conservation issues and policies.

L to R: Bruce Tait, Senior Vice President, Agriculture and Resource Industries, Sheri Anderson, Miles Anderson, and Bob Lowe, Canadian Cattlemen’s Association Environment Committee Chair

L to R: Bruce Tait, Senior Vice President, Agriculture and Resource Industries, Sheri Anderson, Miles Anderson, and Bob Lowe, Canadian Cattlemen’s Association Environment Committee Chair

One of the most prominent endangered species that makes its home on the Anderson’s land is the sage grouse. These native Prairie birds have been in danger of extinction, with the Canadian population declining by 98 per cent since 1998.

In an effort to be part of the conservation plan to save them, Anderson has studied sage grouse nesting habits and adapted his grazing rotation to ensure vegetation necessary for nesting is kept intact. He has also installed an innovate style of fencing to prevent endangered sage grouse from becoming injured in collisions. This innovation also holds benefit for antelope and other species and has captured the attention of other sustainable ranchers and conservationists around the world.

The Andersons have built environmental sustainability into their business and operational plans. Truly stewards of the land, these ranchers are a great reminder of the shared importance of preserving Canadian grasslands for generations to come.

This blog post was submitted by the Canadian Cattlemen’s Association

One thought on “Saskatchewan Ranchers Recognized for Their Conservation Commitment

  1. While I share the observation that we need more stories such as this told, the comment that Internet stories of erosion, water contamination, lost biodiversity may be “fact or fiction” is an unnecessary one. Accepting straight up with no qualifier that agriculture as we practice it has negative impacts we can get on with the business of transforming our food system together.

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