The Top 6 Roundup

We thought it would be fun to look back at the most popular posts on The Real Dirt on Farming Blog in 2015. Here’s how they stacked up in popularity with you, our readers.

#6: Day in the Life – ‘Kidding-around’ with a goat farmer

Anna, Mark and their children at their farm and butcher shop

Anna, Mark and their children at their farm and butcher shop

Hi! My name is Anna Haupt and together with my husband and three young children, we run Teal’s Meats – a provincially licensed butcher shop on our farm in Haldimand County, on the north shore of Lake Erie in Ontario. I also raise a small herd of registered Boer goats on our farm, Springvalley Boer Goats. I enjoy showing, sell breeding stock to other producers and process our market animals for sale through our butcher shop. Our summers are extremely busy serving our butcher shop customers, so I like to kid out (giving birth) my does (female goats) in the winter months when I have a little more time to spend in the barn. Today on our farm…READ MORE Continue reading

Different areas, same challenges

By Matt McIntosh

In September, I had a chance to visit Alberta for the first time since I was a child, and while there, I visited a few farms in conjunction with the annual conference of the Canadian Farm Writers’ Federation.

I come from farm country in Southwestern Ontario, and the diversity between farms in my own province is staggering; the level of diversity between farms at home and out west is even more intriguing. The funny thing is, farmers all seem to encounter similar problems and find similar solutions despite what they produce, where they produce it and on what scale. Continue reading

Thinking like a cow is harder than you think

By Kristen Kelderman, Farm Animal Care Coordinator, Farm & Food Care

Thinking like a cow is harder than you think. (2)

Dylan Biggs works to get cattle to go through a gate one at a time by pressuring into the group of cattle.

The morning starts out the same each day. Staff wake early, drive to a small town meeting hall, unpack supplies, set up the projector and flip chart and try not to forget the ever important coffee and doughnuts.

After coffee cups are filled and neighbours enjoy a quick catch up with each other, everyone settles into their seats for the morning.

We begin.

Recently I had the opportunity to travel around with Alberta rancher and cattle handling expert Dylan Biggs, his father Tom, and ranch employee Elizabeth in a series of handling workshops for Ontario beef farmers. These workshops were put on through Farm & Food Care’s IMPACT animal care program.

After a week of workshops, I’ve become familiar with the content, but each day is a little bit different and they’re certainly never boring. Continue reading

Crop farmers showcase December in Faces of Farming calendar

By Resi Walt

Annette MacKellar Faces of Farming calendar page

Annette MacKellar Faces of Farming calendar page

(Alvinston) – When chatting to Annette MacKellar about her family and their farm, you can see her eyes shine with pride and happiness.

In 2015, Annette appears in the tenth anniversary edition of the Faces of Farming calendar, published by Farm & Food Care Ontario. Her page is sponsored by SeCan and she is featured for the month of December.

Annette grew up on a crop farm and remembers, “I was always with my dad, working right by his side.” She then met her husband Dave in high school. Dave was raised on a century farm dating back to 1875 that his parents still call home today. Annette, Dave and their children all live within a few kilometres of this farm today.

After high school, Annette went to nursing school in Chatham, while Dave studied agriculture at Ridgetown College. Dave was already farming with his father when he and Annette were married in 1982. When asked if they ever considered pursuing different careers, Annette replied emphatically,

“We’ve just always wanted to farm and raise our family on the farm. There’s never been anything else.”

Today, Annette and her family have a crop farm and own a registered seed processing plant in Alvinston, Ontario. Annette and Dave farm with two of their three boys – Adam, the oldest, and Jacob, the youngest. Their third son Paul works off the farm. The crops grown on the MacKellar farm include soybeans, corn, wheat – and more recently – edamame beans. Continue reading

Broccoli grower and race car driver is face of “November” in 2015 Faces of Farming Calendar

By Resi Walt

Kenny Forth’s Faces of Farming calendar page

Kenny Forth’s Faces of Farming calendar page

What does a broccoli farmer do in his spare time? He races cars of course!

Kenny Forth is a fourth-generation vegetable farmer near Lynden, Ontario. Kenny takes pride in knowing that all of his produce is staying in Ontario and feeding people locally.

And, when he’s not working on his farm, he is recognizable as #86 when he is driving his race car at Flamboro Speedway near Hamilton.

In 2015, he appears in the tenth anniversary edition of the Faces of Farming calendar, published by Farm & Food Care Ontario. His page is sponsored by the Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Growers’ Association and he is featured for the month of November. An insert photo in the calendar features a four generation image of Kenny, his dad Ken, grandpa Elgin, son Riley and step brother Matthew. With the exception of Riley who is yet too young to help, the rest are all active in the family farm.

Kenny’s ancestors have a long history in the area. The family farm was once located in Waterdown with them making a move to Lynden in the mid 1970’s due to changing industry conditions. Kenny’s grandfather Elgin recalls that time in the farm’s history. “It was a big decision,” Elgin recollects.

Elgin describes the family farm as being “evolutionary”. While the family has been growing vegetables for decades, the types of vegetables have changed over the years. The family grew field tomatoes and cucumbers for 90 years. At one point, they’ve grown cabbage, cauliflower, strawberries and raised livestock.

About ten years ago, the family decided to focus their business on broccoli and now farm 200 acres of the crop as well as a crop of lettuce in the spring. Broccoli harvest starts in late June and continues until mid November each year. The broccoli plant allows for one cutting, per plant.

On average, Forthdale Farms produces and ships 1,000 cases of broccoli every day during harvest, selling the broccoli to a wholesale company in both bunches and crowns. The fresh broccoli is then sold to grocery stores throughout Ontario.

Summer’s a busy season on the farm and a good team of employees is crucial to getting the crop harvested in time. Helping Kenny and Ken on the farm are 16 seasonal workers who come to the farm from Jamaica each year. Many of them have been coming to the Forth farm annually for decades, returning home to their families in the fall.

Kenny has a need for speed. He loves that aspect of racing – getting up to 140 km/h in close door-to-door racing. Kenny loves the racing community, spending every weekend of the summer at the Flamboro race track.

Kenny started racing when he was twelve years old – first with go karts in Hamilton at a local club. In 1996 he began racing formula 1600 cars. In 1998, he went to full-body stock cars, racing on oval tracks all over Canada in the CASCAR league. Since 2000, Kenny has been racing cars of the late model series, and twice he has won the Flamboro Memorial Cup. Kenny is also proud to have once won the Grisdale Triple Crown Series. The race track is also where he met his wife Marsha. The two are now proud parents to their year-old son Riley.

Racing is truly a family affair. Kenny’s father Ken acts as a spotter while he’s racing, letting Kenny know what is going on with the other drivers around him.

Kenny’s life is made busier through his volunteer work as an OPP Brant County Auxiliary Office, a role he’s served in since 2012. As an auxiliary officer, Kenny volunteers his time to help with community policing initiatives and projects. That can include working at large community events to help with crowd and traffic control, offering assistance at crime or disaster scenes or traffic accidents, or accompanying regular officers on patrol.

Although his schedule is a busy one, Kenny enjoys the lifestyle that being a broccoli farmer allows for.

He has the freedom to set his own schedule, and time to spend on activities outside the farm, such as racing and enjoying time with his young family.

To see an interview with Ken and his family, check out this YouTube video.

The tenth annual “Faces of Farming” calendar, featuring the theme of Home Grown and Hand Made, is designed to introduce the public to a few of Ontario’s passionate and hardworking farmers – the people who produce food in this province. Copies can be ordered online at www.farmfoodcare.org. A list of retailers selling the calendar is also located on that website.

Middlesex grain farmer is “October” in 2015 Faces of Farming calendar

By Resi Walt

Krista Patterson, October Faces of Farming calendar page

Krista Patterson, October Faces of Farming calendar page

(Newbury) – When you compare her to the age of the average farmer in Ontario, Krista Patterson is decades younger, but she already has a wealth of experience under her belt.

Krista is a fourth generation farmer who, along with her mother Lenore, is carrying on the family business built by her father and grandfather. The farm itself is comprised of approximately 1,050 acres of owned and rented land, which are used to produce corn, soybeans, and wheat.

Krista, Lenore, as well as Krista’s Grandmother Evelyn and Uncle Dave work as “one family unit,” Krista explains, helping each other with all aspects of the farm. Dave manages the seed drying processor on their farm, while Lenore aids in shipping grain and is responsible for spreading fertilizer on the fields each year. Krista’s grandmother Evelyn helps with a multitude of tasks – including ensuring that the family takes time to eat when they’re busy on the farm. Krista’s cousin Matt and family friend John help out in the spring with the planting. Continue reading

A chance ad brings this calendar-model couple back to farming

2010 calendarBy Resi Walt

(Thamesville) – It was a chance sighting of an advertisement in a local newspaper that gave Clarence Nywening and his wife Pat the opportunity to return to their farming roots.

Clarence was raised on a beef farm and Pat on a dairy farm. But, after marrying, they had moved away from the farm and on to a different business ventures. However, Clarence said, “It was always my dream to go back to farming.”

In the early days of their marriage they owned a cleaning business, cleaning churches, houses and offices. One day, while cleaning at an office building, they noticed an ad in a newspaper for a farm that was for sale. They knew instantly it was where they wanted to be. Continue reading

Bringing better beef to local buyers

By Matt McIntosh 

Brian Hyland (2)With the welfare of his animals and customer demands in mind, Brian Hyland, a beef farmer from Essex Ontario, has built a business around selling quality, home-grown beef directly to the consumer.

Brian owns and operates Father Wants Beef, a farm and marketing business where he raises 40 beef cattle and red veal (slightly younger beef cattle that go to market at 700 to 800 pounds, or about 300 pounds below regular market weight). Though not a large farm, Brian has found that there is a demand for meat straight from the farm, and he prides himself on filing that demand from his on-site shop and cold storage facility.

“The majority of our meat is sold by pre-order and custom cut, but we do have some people that stop in for individual steaks,” says Brian. “Most are appointment sales; I can get phone calls at all times of the day.” Continue reading

Enjoying local food in Eastern Ontario

By Resi Walt, Farm & Food Care Ontario

A taste of local food in eastern OntarioLike most people, I enjoy day trips and exploring new places – especially when those places specialize in food! Over the course of Ontario’s Local Food Week from June 1-7, I had many opportunities to celebrate the food that is grown and produce in Ontario. One highlight from the week was the trip I took to Eastern Ontario.

Farm & Food Care Ontario partnered with Foodland Ontario to offer a local food experience for food enthusiasts from the Ottawa-area. Farm & Food Care Ontario has been organizing these farm tours since 2006, and each year they grow in popularity. The goal is to showcase different commodities and types of farming every year, and the tour participants include chefs, recipe developers, food writers, culinary instructors, and professional home economists. The tour is always such a great learning experience and good fun too. Continue reading

Day in the Life – Planting P.E.I. Potatoes

DayintheLifeMy name is Keisha Rose and I’m a 6th generation potato farmer working on my family’s farm in North Lake, Prince Edward Island.

I’ve worked on the farm on a part-time basis since I graduated high school nine years ago. The planting season lined up well with the end of the winter university semester, so it was the obvious job to go to at that time. It wasn’t until I moved away for a while that I realized I didn’t want to be away from North Lake and the farm.

Keisha Rose is a 6th generation potato farmer  in Prince Edward Island

Keisha Rose is a 6th generation potato farmer in Prince Edward Island

After graduating university with a Business degree, I was encouraged to go and get a job away from the family farm so I could make sure I had experience working outside of our family business. I worked for the past few years as a crop insurance representative. This job was a great learning experience and I got to see other farms and meet other farmers, and it gave me an even greater appreciation for the agricultural industry.

However, the pull to farm always seemed to be something that was present in my mind. Even as a young girl I loved visits to the field or the warehouse, so I felt it was something I couldn’t ignore. Although I have been working on and off the farm in the past, this year I decided to take more of a full-time, year-round role.

What I love is that every day is something new. You are usually outside, driving something, or trying to figure out the next problem. It comes with a lot hard work, a large time commitment, and a need to be constantly willing to learn, but in the end you get to see the “fruits of your labour” – quite literally!

Monday, May 18th, The first day we planted. My view from inside the box of the planter where I was working.

Monday, May 18th, The first day we planted. My view from inside the box of the planter where I was working.

Continue reading